Research > Microbe > Bacteria > listeria

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Common Generic Names

Electrolytically Generated Hypochlorous Acid (HOCl)
Neutral Electrolyzed Water (NEW)
Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water (EOW)
Electro-chemically Activated Water (ECA)
Super-oxidized water (SOW)

Results: 22 published articles

Microbe(s): Listeria monocytogenes

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

Time to detection experiments (TTD) based on turbidometry using an automatic Bioscreen C is a useful and straightforward method for estimating microbial growth parameters (lag time (), growth rate () and work to be done (h0)) at constant temperature. This study investigated the effects of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) and heat treatment on Listeria monocytogenes growth at different recovery temperatures (10 C, 15 C, 25 C, and 30 C). Similar surviving and sublethally injured L. monocytogenes populations were obtained by heat treatment (55 C for 10 min) and SAEW treatment (available chlorine concentration of 30 mg/l and ratio of bacteria against SAEW of 8:2 for 30 s). In these experimental conditions, stresses had greater impact on the and h0 parameter in comparison with recovery temperature while there was no great change in growth rate under isothermal conditions. Larger values and h0 parameters were observed in sublethal-heat injured L. monocytogenes (the maximum and h0 parameters are 30.199 h and 1.6492) as compared to SAEW groups (the maximum and h0 parameters are 22.634 h and 1.4396). The sensitivity analysis of SAEW and heat treatments on h0 parameter indicated that SAEW treatment showed a higher influence. The collinearity diagnostics of independent variables recovery temperature (T), , for dependent variable (h0 parameter) demonstrated that T, and had strong collinearity. In addition, the established secondary models in this study have good performances on predicting the effect of recovery temperature on bacterial growth parameters.

Microbe(s): Listeria monocytogenes

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

Listeria monocytogenes contamination in ready-to-eat (RTE) fish products, in particular in cold-smoked salmon is an important food safety concern. This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water as a pretreatment method during the process of cold-smoked salmon to inactivate L. monocytogenes. In addition, the effect of EO water treatment on the sensory and textural quality of the final product was also evaluated. Raw Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fillets were inoculated with L. monocytogenes (with an approximately cell number of 6 105 CFU/g L. monocytogenes ATCC 19114) and treated with EO water at three different temperatures (20, 30, and 40 C) and at three different exposure time of 2, 6, and 10 min before the cold-smoking process. A combination of EO water and a mild temperature (40 C) had reduced L. monocytogenes populations by 2.85 log10 CFU/g. The sensory as evaluated by a consumer panel (N = 71) and texture, which was measured by texture analysis showed no significant changes between EO and mild temperature treated samples and the control.

Microbe(s):  Listeria monocytogenes, Morganella morganii

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

Listeria monocytogenes and Morganella morganii have been implicated in listeriosis outbreaks and histamine fish poisoning, respectively. Possible sources of contamination of food products include processing equipment, food handlers, and fish smokehouses. Treatment of food preparation surfaces and of whole fish during handling with agents such as, electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water, could reduce biofilm formation on seafood products and in seafood processing plants. We examined the efficacy of EO water against L. monocytogenes and M. morganii biofilms using the MBEC Assay System (Innovotech Inc.), conveyor belt coupons, and raw fish surfaces. The MBEC Assay System was used to assess the activity of EO water against 24-h biofilms of 90 L. monocytogenes strains and five M. morganii strains. Biofilms were exposed to PBS or EO water for 0 (control), 5, 15, and 30 min. All bacterial isolates were susceptible (reduction of 7 log10CFU) to treatment with EO water for 5 min based on results obtained using this assay system. EO water was used to treat four L. monocytogenes strains and one M. morganii strain attached to conveyor belt coupons and fish surfaces. Three L. monocytogenes strains and one M. morganii strain on belt coupons were reduced by 12.5 log10CFU/cm2 by exposure (5 min) to EO water compared to exposure to sterile distilled water. Strain to strain variability in susceptibility to EO water was evidenced by the fact that numbers of one L. monocytogenes strain were not reduced by EO water treatment of belt surfaces. EO water was not effective against L. monocytogenes and M. morganii on fish surfaces as growth occurred during cold storage. These results suggest that exposure of conveyor belts to EO water for a minimum of 5 min could assist in the removal of some biofilms. Removal of food residue with continuous or intermittent spraying of food processing equipment (e.g., conveyor belts, slicers) could reduce or prevent further biofilm formation. Additional sanitizers must be investigated for activity against bacteria associated with raw fish.

Microbe(s): Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

Low concentration electrolyzed water (LcEW) has been proved to be an effective sanitizer against pathogens in cell suspensions as well as pathogens and spoilage organisms attached to vegetables, poultry and meat. In this study, effect of current, electrolysis time and salt concentration on physical properties (pH, ORP and ACC) and inactivation efficacy of LcEW was monitored. Pure cultures of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes were prepared and exposure treatment was performed for bacteria inactivation study in cell suspensions at room temperature (23 2 C). Our results showed increased reduction of both pathogens with the increase in current. Changes of current also affected the ACC, pH and ORP values of the tested solution. Values of ACC, pH and ORP were increased with the increase in current. Log reduction of 4.9 5.6 log CFU/mL for both pathogens was achieved when the current was increased from 1.15 to 1.45 A. Electrolysis time and percent of salt concentration also influenced the physical properties of LcEW. Stability of LcEW was also investigated under different conditions and it was observed that LcEW produced with increased electrical current was more stable during storage. Therefore, current might influence the properties and sanitizing effect of LcEW.

Microbe(s): Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

The effectiveness of neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) to sanitize cutting boards used for food preparation was investigated. Cutting boards made of hardwood and bamboo were inoculated with Escherichia coli K12 and Listeria innocua, dried for 1 h, washed, rinsed and sanitized with NEW, sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) solution, or tap water (control). After each washing protocol, surviving bacterial populations were determined. Results showed that both NEW and NaClO sanitizing solutions produced similar levels of bacterial reductions. In manual washing, the population reductions by NEW and NaClO were 3.4 and 3.6 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for E. coli, and 4.1 and 3.9 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for L. innocua, respectively. In the automatic washing, the reductions by NEW and NaClO were 4.0 and 4.0 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for E. coli, and 4.2 and 3.6 log10 CFU/100 cm2 for L. innocua, respectively. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed in surviving bacteria counts when comparing board material types.

Microbe(s): Listeria monocytogenes

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

The objective of this study was to develop a model of the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in pork untreated or treated with low concentration electrolyzed water (LcEW) and strong acid electrolyzed water (SAEW), as a function of temperature. The experimental data obtained under different temperatures (4, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 C) were fitted into the modified Gompertz model to generate the growth parameters including specific growth rate (SGR) and lag time (LT) with high coefficients of determination (R2 >0.97). The obtained SGR and LT were employed to develop square root models to evaluate the effects of storage temperature on the growth kinetics of L. monocytogenes in pork. The values of bias factor (0.924-1.009) and accuracy factor (1.105-1.186), which were regarded as acceptable, demonstrated that the obtained models could provide good and reliable predictions and be suitable for the purpose of microbiological risk assessment of L. monocytogenes in pork.

Microbe(s): Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157 : H7

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

Effects of alkaline electrolyzed water (AlEW), acidic electrolyzed water (AcEW), 100 ppm sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), deionized water (DIW), 1% citric acid (CA) alone, and combinations of AlEW with 1% CA (AlEW + CA), in reducing the populations of spoilage bacteria and foodborne pathogens on cabbage were investigated at various dipping times (3, 5, and 10 min) with different dipping temperatures (1, 20, 40, and 50 C). Inhibitory effect of the selected optimal treatment against Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157 : H7 on cabbage were also evaluated. Compared to the untreated control, AlEW treatment most effectively reduced the numbers of total bacteria, yeast, and mold, followed by AcEW and 100-ppm NaClO treatments. All treatments dip washed for 5 min significantly reduced the numbers of total bacteria, yeast, and mold on cabbage. With increasing dipping temperature from 1 to 50 C, the reductions of total bacteria, yeast, and mold were significantly increased from 0.19 to 1.12 log CFU/g in the DIW wash treatment (P < 0.05). Combined 1% CA with AlEW treatment at 50 C showed the reduction of around 3.98 and 3.45 log CFU/g on the total count, and yeast and mold, effective reduction of L. monocytogenes (3.99 log CFU/g), and E. coli O157 : H7 (4.19 log CFU/g) on cabbage. The results suggest that combining AlEW with CA could be a possible method to control foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria effectively on produce.

Microbe(s): Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

Food safety issues and increases in food borne illnesses have promulgated the development of new sanitation methods to eliminate pathogenic organisms on foods and surfaces in food service areas. Electrolyzed oxidizing water (EO water) shows promise as an environmentally friendly broad spectrum microbial decontamination agent. EO water is generated by the passage of a dilute salt solution (1% NaCl) through an electrochemical cell. This electrolytic process converts chloride ions and water molecules into chlorine oxidants (Cl2, HOCl/ClO-). At a near-neutral pH (pH 6.3-6.5), the predominant chemical species is the highly biocidal hypochlorous acid species (HOCl) with the oxidation reduction potential (ORP) of the solution ranging from 800 to 900 mV. The biocidal activity of near-neutral EO water was evaluated at 25 C using pure cultures of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis. Treatment of these organisms, in pure culture, with EO water at concentrations of 20, 50, 100, and 120 ppm total residual chlorine (TRC) and 10 min of contact time resulted in 100% inactivation of all five organisms (reduction of 6.1-6.7 log10 CFU/mL). Spray treatment of surfaces in food service areas with EO water containing 278-310 ppm TRC (pH 6.38) resulted in a 79-100% reduction of microbial growth. Dip (10 min) treatment of spinach at 100 and 120 ppm TRC resulted in a 4.0-5.0 log10 CFU/mL reduction of bacterial counts for all organisms tested. Dipping (10 min) of lettuce at 100 and 120 ppm TRC reduced bacterial counts of E. coli by 0.24-0.25 log10 CFU/mL and reduced all other organisms by 2.43-3.81 log10 CFU/mL.

Microbe(s): Escherichia coli K12, Listeria innocua, Pseudomonas putida

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

This study investigated the efficacy of sanitized ice for the reduction of bacteria in the water collected from the ice that melted during storage of whole and filleted Tilapia fish. Also, bacterial reductions on the fish fillets were investigated. The sanitized ice was prepared by freezing solutions of PROSAN (an organic acid formulation) and neutral electrolyzed water (NEW). For the whole fish study, the survival of the natural microflora was determined from the water of the melted ice prepared with PROSAN and tap water. These water samples were collected during an 8 h storage period. For the fish fillet study, samples were inoculated with Escherichia coli K12, Listeria innocua, and Pseudomonas putida then stored on crushed sanitized ice. The efficacies of these were tested by enumerating each bacterial species on the fish fillet and in the water samples at 12 and 24 h intervals for 72 h, respectively. Results showed that each bacterial population was reduced during the test. However, a bacterial reduction of < 1 log CFU was obtained for the fillet samples. A maximum of approximately 2 log CFU and > 3 log CFU reductions were obtained in the waters sampled after the storage of whole fish and the fillets, respectively. These reductions were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the water from sanitized ice when compared with the water from the unsanitized melted ice. These results showed that the organic acid formulation and NEW considerably reduced the bacterial numbers in the melted ice and thus reduced the potential for crosscontamination.

Microbe(s): Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

Strong acid electrolyzed water (SAEW) has a very limited application due to its low pH value (< 2.7) and corrosive characteristics. Thus, we developed new low concentration electrolyzed water (LcEW). The efficacy of LcEW under various treatment conditions for the inactivation of different foodborne pathogens in pure culture was evaluated and compared with SAEW. The efficiency of LcEW and SAEW for the inactivation of predominant foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella Typhimurium) with different dipping times (1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 min), pH values (2.5, 4.0, 5.0, 6.0 and 9.0) and temperatures (4, 15, 23, 35 and 50 C) were determined. Reductions of bacterial populations of 1.7 to 6.6 log10 CFU/mL in various treated conditions in cell suspensions were observed after treatment with LcEW and SAEW, compared to the untreated control. Dip washing (1 min at 35 C) of lettuce leaves in both electrolyzed water resulted in 2.5 to 4.0 log10 CFU/g compared to the unwashed control. Strong inactivation effects were observed in LcEW, and no significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed between LcEW and SAEW. The effective form of chlorine compounds in LcEW was almost exclusively hypochlorous acid (HOCl), which has strong antimicrobial activity and leaves no residuals due to the low concentration of residual chlorine. Thus, LcEW could be widely applied as a new sanitizer in the food industry.

Microbe(s): Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

The ability of electrolyzed water (EW) to inactivate foodborne pathogens on the surfaces of lettuce and spinach was investigated. Lettuce and spinach leaves were inoculated with a cocktail of 3 strains each of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes and treated with acidic electrolyzed water (AC-EW), alkaline electrolyzed water (AK-EW), alkaline electrolyzed water followed by acidic electrolyzed water (sequential treatment, AK-EW + AC-EW), deionized water followed by acidic electrolyzed water (sequential treatment, DW + AC-EW), and deionized water (control, DW) for 15, 30 s, and 1, 3, and 5 min at room temperature (22 2 C). For all 3 pathogens, the same pattern of microbial reduction on lettuce and spinach were apparent. The relative efficacy of reduction was AC-EW > DW + AC-EW = AK-EW + AC-EW > AK-EW > control. After a 3-min treatment of AC-EW, the 3 tested pathogens were reduced below the detection limit (0.7 log). DW + AC-EW and AK-EW + AC-EW produced the same levels of reduction after 5 min when compared to the control. AK-EW did not reduce levels of pathogens even after a 5-min treatment on lettuce and spinach. Results suggest that AC-EW treatment was able to significantly reduce populations of the 3 tested pathogens from the surfaces of lettuce and spinach with increasing time of exposure.

Microbe(s): Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Listeria monocytogenes

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

Recent foodborne outbreaks implicating spinach and lettuce have increased consumer concerns regarding the safety of fresh produce. While the most common commercial antimicrobial intervention for fresh produce is wash water containing 50 to 200 ppm chlorine, this study compares the effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite, chlorine, and acidic electrolyzed water for inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto leafy greens. Fresh mixed greens were left uninoculated or inoculated with approximately 6 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and L. monocytogenes and treated by immersion for 60 or 90 s in different wash solutions (1:150, wt/vol), including 50 ppm of chlorine solution acidified to pH 6.5, acidic electrolyzed water (pH 2.1 0.2, oxygen reduction potential of 1,100 mV, 30 to 35 ppm of free chlorine), and acidified sodium chlorite (1,200 ppm, pH 2.5). Samples were neutralized and homogenized. Bacterial survival was determined by standard spread plating on selective media. Each test case (organism treatment time) was replicated twice with five samples per replicate. There was no difference (P 0.05) in the time of immersion on the antimicrobial effectiveness of the treatments. Furthermore, there was no difference (P 0.05) in survival of the three organisms regardless of treatment or time. Acidified sodium chlorite, resulted in reductions in populations of 3 to 3.8 log CFU/g and was more effective than chlorinated water (2.1 to 2.8 log CFU/g reduction). These results provide the produce industry with important information to assist in selection of effective antimicrobial strategies.

Microbe(s): Listeria monocytogenes

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

An electrochemical treatment system consisting of a pulsed electrical power supply and an electrical treatment chamber was designed and evaluated for inactivation Listeria monocytogenes in recirculated brine for chilling processed bacons. The brine was tested under different currents and temperatures. An average D-value of 1.61 min in the storage tank could be achieved at 7 mA/cm3 current with the fresh brine (t = 0 h). For the spent brine (t = 20 h), the D-value was 2.5 min in the treatment chamber at 35 mA/cm3. The average D-values in the treatment chamber were approximately 2.5 min at all three temperatures (4, 0, -8 8C) at 35 mA/cm3.

Microbe(s): Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

This study evaluated the efficacy of neutral electrolyzed water (NEW; 64.1 mg/liter of active chlorine) to reduce populations of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes on plastic and wooden kitchen cutting boards. Its effectiveness was compared with that of a sodium hypochlorite solution (NaClO; 62.3 mg/liter of active chlorine). Inoculated portions of cutting boards were rinsed in either NEW or NaClO solutions, or deionized water (control). Plastic boards were rinsed for 1 min and wooden boards for 1 and 5 min. After each treatment, the surviving population of each strain was determined on the surface and in the soaking water. No significant difference (P 0.05) was found between the final populations of each strain with regard to the treatment solutions (NEW or NaClO). However, a significant difference (P 0.05) was revealed between surface materials after 1 min of washing. Whereas in plastic boards the initial bacterial populations were reduced by 5 log CFU/50 cm2, in wooden cutting boards they underwent a reduction of <3 log CFU/50 cm2. A 5-min exposure time yielded reductions of about 4 log CFU/50 cm2. The surviving populations of all bacteria in NEW and NaClO washing solutions were <1 log CFU/ml after soaking both surfaces. This study revealed that NEW treatment is an effective method for reducing microbial contamination on plastic and wooden cutting boards. NEW efficacy was comparable to that of NaClO, with the advantage of having a larger storage time.

Microbe(s): Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

Antibacterial activity of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water prepared from 0.05% or 0.10% (w/v) sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions against indigenous bacteria associated with fresh strawberries (Fragaria ananassa) was evaluated. The efficacy of EO water and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution in eliminating and controlling the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated onto strawberries stored at 4 +/- 1 C up to 15 d was investigated at exposure time of 1, 5, or 10 min. Posttreatment neutralization of fruit surfaces was also determined. More than 2 log10 CFU/g reductions of aerobic mesophiles were obtained in fruits washed for 10 or 15 min in EO water prepared from 0.10% (w/v) NaCl solution. Bactericidal activity of the disinfectants against L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 was not affected by posttreatment neutralization, and increasing exposure time did not significantly increase the antibacterial efficacy against both pathogens. While washing fruit surfaces with distilled water resulted in 1.90 and 1.27 log10 CFU/mL of rinse fluid reduction of L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7, respectively, > 2.60 log10 CFU/mL of rinse fluid reduction of L. monocytogenes and up to 2.35 and 3.12 log10 CFU/mL of rinse fluid reduction of E. coli O157:H7 were observed on fruit surfaces washed with EO water and NaOCl solution, respectively. Listeria monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 populations decreased over storage regardless of prior treatment. However, EO water and aqueous NaOCl did not show higher antimicrobial potential than water treatment during refrigeration storage.

Microbe(s): Listeria monocytogenes

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

The ability of electrolyzed (EO) water to inactivate Listeria monocytogenes in suspension and biofilms on stainless steel in the presence of organic matter (sterile filtered chicken serum) was investigated. A five-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes was treated with deionized, alkaline EO, and acidic EO water containing chicken serum (0, 5, and 10 ml/liter) for 1 and 5 min. Coupons containing L. monocytogenes biofilms were also overlaid with chicken serum (0, 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 ml/liter) and then treated with deionized water, alkaline EO water, acidic EO water, alkaline EO water followed by acidic EO water, and a sodium hypochlorite solution for 30 and 60 s. Chicken serum decreased the oxidation-reduction potential and chlorine concentration of acidic EO water but did not significantly affect its pH. In the absence of serum, acidic EO water containing chlorine at a concentration of 44 mg/liter produced a > 6-log reduction in L. monocytogenes in suspension, but its bactericidal activity decreased with increasing serum concentration. Acidic EO water and acidified sodium hypochlorite solution inactivated L. monocytogenes biofilms to similar levels, and their bactericidal effect decreased with increasing serum concentration and increased with increasing time of exposure. The sequential 30-s treatment of alkaline EO water followed by acidic EO water produced 4- to 5-log reductions in L. monocytogenes biofilms, even in the presence of organic matter.

Microbe(s): Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

The effects of chlorine and pH on the bactericidal activity of electrolyzed (EO) water were examined against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes. The residual chlorine concentration of EO water ranged from 0.1 to 5.0 mg/l, and the pH effect was examined at pH 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0. The bactericidal activity of EO water increased with residual chlorine concentration for both pathogens, and complete inactivation was achieved at residual chlorine levels equal to or higher than 1.0 mg/l. The results showed that both pathogens are very sensitive to chlorine, and residual chlorine level of EO water should be maintained at 1.0 mg/l or higher for practical applications. For each residual chlorine level, bactericidal activity of EO water increased with decreasing pH for both pathogens. However, with sufficient residual chlorine (greater than 2 mg/l), EO water can be applied in a pH range between 2.6 (original pH of EO water) and 7.0 while still achieving complete inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes.

Microbe(s): Escherichia coli O157: H7, Listeria monocytogenes

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

Raw fish is prone to the risk of microbial outbreaks due to contamination by pathogenic microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes. Therefore, it is essential to treat raw fish to inactivate pathogenic microorganisms. Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water (EO) is a novel antimicrobial agent containing acidic solution with a pH of 2.6, Oxidation Reduction Potential (ORP) of 1150 mV, and 70 90 ppm free chlorine, and alkaline solution with a pH of 11.4 and ORP of 795 mV. This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of acidic EO water treatment and alkaline EO water treatment followed by acidic EO water treatment at various temperatures for the inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes Scott A on the muscle and skin surfaces of inoculated salmon fillets. Inoculated salmon fillets were treated with acidic EO water at 22 and 35 C and 90 ppm free-chlorine solution as control at 22 C for 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 min. The acidic EO water treatments resulted in a reduction of L. monocytogenes Scott A population in the range of 0.40 log10 CFU/g (60%) at 22 C to 1.12 log10 CFU/g (92.3%) at 35 C. Treatment of inoculated salmon fillets with acidic EO water reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations by 0.49 log10 CFU/g (67%) at 22 C and 1.07 log10 CFU/g (91.1%) at 35 C. The maximum reduction with chlorine solution (control) was 1.46 log10 CFU/g (96.3%) for E. coli O157:H7 and 1.3 log10 CFU/g (95.3%) for L. monocytogenes Scott A at 64 min. A response surface model was developed for alkaline treatment followed by acidic EO water treatment to predict treatment times in the range of 5 30 min and temperatures in the range of 22 35 C for effective treatment with alkaline EO water followed by acidic water, alkaline and acidic water treatments. Response surface analysis demonstrated maximum log reductions of 1.33 log10 CFU/g (95.3%) for E. coli O157:H7 and 1.09 log10 CFU/g (91.9%) for L. monocytogenes Scott A. Data collected from the treatments was used to develop empirical models as a function of treatment times and temperature for prediction of population of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes Scott A. Correlations (R2) of 0.52 and 0.77 were obtained between model predicted and experimental log10 reduction for E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes Scott A reductions, respectively. These results clearly indicated that EO water has a potential to be used for decontamination of raw fish.

Microbe(s): Listeria monocytogenes

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

Biofilms are potential sources of contamination to food in processing plants, because they frequently survive sanitizer treatments during cleaning. The objective of this research was to investigate the combined use of alkaline and acidic electrolyzed (EO) water in the inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms on stainless steel surfaces. Biofilms were grown on rectangular stainless steel (type 304, no. 4 finish) coupons (2 by 5 cm) in a 1:10 dilution of tryptic soy broth that contained a five-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes for 48 h at 25 C. The coupons with biofilms were then treated with acidic EO water or alkaline EO water or with alkaline EO water followed by acidic EO water produced at 14 and 20 A for 30, 60, and 120 s. Alkaline EO water alone did not produce significant reductions in L. monocytogenes biofilms when compared with the control. Treatment with acidic EO water only for 30 to 120 s, on the other hand, reduced the viable bacterial populations in the biofilms by 4.3 to 5.2 log CFU per coupon, whereas the combined treatment of alkaline EO water followed by acidic EO water produced an additional 0.3- to 1.2-log CFU per coupon reduction. The population of L. monocytogenes reduced by treatments with acidic EO water increased significantly with increasing time of exposure. However, no significant differences occurred between treatments with EO water produced at 14 and 20 A. Results suggest that alkaline and acidic EO water can be used together to achieve a better inactivation of biofilms than when applied individually.

Microbe(s): Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

Aim: To ascertain the efficacy of neutral electrolysed water (NEW) in reducing Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes on glass and stainless steel surfaces. Its effectiveness for that purpose is compared with that of a sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) solution with similar pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and active chlorine content. Methods and Results: First, the bactericidal activity of NEW was evaluated over pure cultures (8-5 log CFU ml-1) of the abovementioned strains: all of them were reduced by more than 7 log CFU ml-1 within 5 min of exposure either to NEW (63 mg l-1 active chlorine) or to NaClO solution (62 mg l-1 active chlorine). Then, stainless steel and glass surfaces were inoculated with the same strains and rinsed for 1 min in either NEW, NaClO solution or deionized water (control). In the first two cases, the populations of all the strains decreased by more than 6 log CFU 50 cm-2. No significant difference (P 0 05) was found between the final populations of each strain with regard to the treatment solutions (NEW or NaClO solution) or to the type of surface. Conclusions: NEW was revealed to be as effective as NaClO at significantly reducing the presence of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria (in this study, E. coli, L. monocytogenes, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus) on stainless steel and glass surfaces. Significance and Impact of the Study: NEW has the advantage of being safer than NaClO and easier to handle. Hence, it represents an advantageous alternative for the disinfection of surfaces in the food industry.

Microbe(s): Listeria monocytogenes

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

The effectiveness of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water for the inactivation of L. monocytogenes insuspension and when inoculated on lettuce leaves was evaluated. An electrolytic cell for the production of EO water was built and a solution of 5% NaCl was used. The EO water produced had a residual chlorine concentration of 29 parts per million (ppm) and pH 2.83. Ten strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from processed chicken (109 CFU/ml) were inoculated into 9 ml of EO water or 9 ml of deionized water (control) and incubated at 15 C for 5, 10, 15 and 20 min. The surviving population of each strain was determined on Columbia agar. An exposure time of 5 min reduced the populations by approximately 6.6log CFU/ml. The most resistant strains to sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) were selected and used in a strain mixture (9.56 log CFU/ml, 109UFC/ml approximately) for the inoculation of 35 lettuce samples, by the dip inoculation method using distilled water as control. The population mean of L. monocytogenes after treatment with EO water and distilled water was reduced by 3.92 and 2.46 log CFU/ml respectively (p=0.00001). EO water and 6% acetic acid (vinegar) were combined to improve the EO water effect on L. monocytogenes inoculated in lettuce; the effectiveness of this combination was examined. The results showed that there was a synergistic effect of both antimicrobial agents (population reduction by 5.49 logCFU/ml approximately) on the viability of L. monocytogenes cells.

Microbe(s): Listeria monocytogenes, Flavobacterium spp.

ABSTRACT – Full Text PDF

Aims: To determine the effect of chlorine on mixed bacterial biofilms on stainless steel (SS) and conveyor belt surfaces. Methods and Results: Biofilms were exposed to pH-adjusted (6.5) and non-pH-adjusted solutions of chlorine (200, 400 and 600 ppm) for either 2, 10 or 20 min and survivors enumerated. There were significant differences in cell death relating to chlorine concentration and exposure time for the cells attached to the SS, with solutions adjusted to pH 6.5 being more effective at reducing numbers. In contrast, on conveyor belt surfaces cell numbers decreased by less than two logs after 20 min regardless of treatment. Conclusions: Chlorine effectiveness is dependent on its concentration, solution pH, exposure time, the nature of the surface and the microbial species present. Significance and Impact of Study: In the interests of food safety it is important that sanitizer users are aware of the conditions that effect their performance.

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